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h4. Notes

See [VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines|VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines#notes] for more information about encoding notes (footnote, endnotes, etc.).

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h4. Photographs, Graphics, and other Images

See [VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines|VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines#fig] for more information about photographs, graphics and other images.

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h4. Lists

See [VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines|VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines#li] for more information about lists.

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h4. Tables

See [VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines|VWWP TEI P5 Encoding Guidelines#table] for more information about tables.

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quotes
quotes

Quotes

Wiki MarkupQuotes are denoted by quotation marks. Only text that comes within quotation marks will be marked as a quotation for the purposes of encoding. There are two types of quotes: quotes that are external to the text and quotes that are internal. The [quote|http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/ref-quote.html] element is used for passages that are external to the text, like a reference to a study or another book. \[ Internal quotes are quotes that are from inside the text quotes occur inside the text (e.g., character speeches or thoughts , or notes written by characters, or terms used in the book) and have various TEI elements to represent them.

External
Internal

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Quotes that come from outside the text are marked by first using a <cit> tag, to denote an external citation. Within the <cit> tag there are two smaller parts, <quote> and <bibl>. <quote> encompasses the body of the quote, or actual quoted text. The <bibl> tag encompasses any bibliographic reference given that identifies the source of the text, such as a title or author. For a more comprehensive discussion of the <bibl> tag, please see the <bibl> section of the guidelines. The <cit> tag denotes the citation as a unit, and the <quote> and <bibl> tags denote smaller portions of the larger unit. official TEI P5 guidelines. Quotes can also be marked with other tags, for instance, inside the <quote> tag, you can have an <l> tag to denote a line of poetry.

Sometimes, citations will occur within the text. In that case, you still use the <cit> tag and mark the quote as you normally would. You must remember, however, that all of the words within the <cit> must be within either a <bibl> or a <quote> tag. You do not need both <quote> and <bibl>, but you do need at least one.

Code Block
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xml
<cit>
    <quote>
        <l>Parted without the least regret,</l>
        <l>Except that they had ever met.</l>
        <l>* * * *</l>
        <l>Misses, the tale that I relate,</l>
        <l>This lesson seems to carry:</l>
        <l>Choose not alone a proper mate,</l>
        <l>But proper time to marry!</l>
    </quote>
    <bibl>
        <author>Cowper,</author>
        <title level="a">Pairing Time anticipated</title>
    </bibl>
</cit>

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Quotations in the text that indicate speech, thought, writing, etc. by one or more characters is marked by the various TEI elements. For instance, dialogue or notes written from one character to another would be indicated using this <q> element. The <q> tag will generally come inside of a set of <p> tags, since most dialogue is denoted within the text by setting it apart as a separate paragraph. Quotes can come within quotes, such as when one speaker quotes someone else. If there is an external quote inside an internal quote, for instance, a character quotes the bible, the correct tags will be used to delineate between the two distinct types of quotes. Sometimes, quotation marks

The emph, foreign, distinct, mentioned, term and soCalled values indicate that a quote is linguistically set a part. For instance, emph is used to denote special emphases placed on a word via quotation marks. The foreign tag indicates that quotation marks were used because the word is in a foreign language. The distinct tag signifies that the quote is in quotation marks because to set it apart from the rest of the text due to some linguistic peculiarity, slang, for instance, or regional dialect. Mentioned is used to indicate that the writer is talking about the word itself rather than using the word. For instance, talking about the part of speech of the word "canary." Term indicates that the word was put in quotation marks because it is a discipline or subject specific term. For example, if the author uses quotations to demarcate medical terminology, then the term type would be indicated. Finally, soCalled is used to indicate scare quotes. If the author removes him or herself from the word via quotation marks, then you mark the term as "soCalled." Below is a reference list of the different TEI elements used to mark up internal quotes:

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