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  • XML-first publishing for full-text, HTML articles

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Workflow: going straight to XHTML

  • Note: Converting article to XML, and then to XHTML, would be preferred workflow for the long-term.

Export PDF as HTML
 

Info
titleSample export HTML
<p class="s1" style=
"padding-top: 3pt;padding-left: 7pt;text-indent: 0pt;text-align: left;">
New Light on the Relationship between the Montecitorio Obelisk and
Ara Pacis of Augustus</p>
<p style="text-indent: 0pt;text-align: left;"><br /></p>
<p class="s2" style=
"padding-left: 7pt;text-indent: 0pt;text-align: justify;">BERNARD
FRISCHER, Indiana University, USA</p>
<p class="s2" style=
"padding-left: 7pt;text-indent: 0pt;text-align: left;">JOHN POLLINI
and NICHOLAS CIPOLLA, University of Southern California, USA
GIUSEPPINA CAPRIOTTI, Centro Archeologico Italiano, Cairo</p>
<p class="s2" style=
"padding-left: 7pt;text-indent: 0pt;text-align: justify;">JACKIE
MURRAY, University of Kentucky, USA</p>
<p class="s2" style=
"padding-left: 7pt;text-indent: 0pt;text-align: left;">MOLLY
SWETNAM-BURLAND, William and Mary College, USA KARL GALINSKY,
University of Texas, USA</p>

 

HTML will export in minified form. For large files, use "Tidy" app to unfold and indent code.

  • invoke from the command line
  • $ tidy Desktop/SDH-Magli.html > Desktop/output.html

     

Extract all style components to CSS document
 

Info
titleSample CSS
@import url('https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans');
@import url('https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=EB+Garamond');

h1 {
	/*title of the paper*/
	margin-top: 2em;
	line-height: 2.2;
	font-size: 2em;
	font-family: pt-sans, sans-serif;
}
#main h2 {
	/*section title*/
	font-size: 1.5em;
	margin-top: 1em;
	font-family: pt-sans, sans-serif;
}
#section h2 {
	/*section title*/
	font-size: 1.5em;
	margin-top: 1em;
	font-family: pt-sans, sans-serif;
}

Key elements for OJS

<article>
<header>
<h1>TheTitleOfTheArticle</h1>
<div class="byline">
thePaper'sAuthor
</div>
</header>
<hr>gray line that separate sections
<div class="abstract">
<p></p>
</div>
<hr>gray line that separate sections
<div class="data">
<p><span class="bold">Key words:</span><br/>
</p>
<p><span class="bold">SDH Reference:</span><br/>

<span class="doi">doiAddressFormat:"https://doi.org/##.###"</span>
</p>
</div>
<hr>gray line that separate sections
<br/>

<section>
<h2>SectionTitle</h2>

<p class="center"></p>
<p><span class="sup"></span> <span class="bold"></span></p>
<div class="rights">
<p>author'sAddress,ContactInfo,etc</p>
<p>copyrightsInfo</p>
</div>

<hr>gray line that separate sections
<br/>

<span id="page">pageFooter/Header</span>
<div class="clear"></div><br/>

<figure>
<img alt="graph" class="graph" src="img01.jpg">
<figcaption>Fig.1Caption</figcaption>
</figure>

<figure>
<img alt="sim" scr="img02.jpg">
<figcaption>Fig.2Caption</figcaption>
</figure>
</section>

<section>
<h2>ReferencesSectionTitle</h2>
<div class="reference">
<p>reference1</p>
<p>reference2</p>
</div>
</section>

<section>
<h2>AppendixSectionTitle</h2>
<table>
<caption>tableCaption</caption>
<thead>
<tr>tableRow
<th>tableHeader</th>
<th>tableHeader</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>tableData</td>
<td>tableData</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</section>

</article>
</body>
 

Normalize HTML tags in PDF export

Crosswalk

 

 

Info
titleSample final HTML

Final HTML

<html>
 <body>
 <article>
 <header>
 <div class="title">Archaeoastronomy in the Khmer Heartland</div>
 <div class="byline">
 GIULIO MAGLI, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
 </div>
 </header>
 <hr>
 <div class="abstract">
 <p>The heartland of the Khmer empire is filled with magnificent monuments built over the course of many centuries. These monuments include the world-famous “state temples,” such as Angkor Wat, and also many other temples as well as huge water reservoirs. Using data from Google Earth as well as GIS and reconstructing the ancient sky with Stellarium, we investigate the relationships of astronomy with orientation and topography in a systematic fashion, following the methods of modern Archaeoastronomy and strictly keeping at bay vague and/or esoteric proposals put forward by previous writers. As a result, a very clear pattern of cardinal orientation and alignment arises, connected with the temples’ symbolism and the management of power by the Khmer kings. As a bonus, a comparison with the Angkor monuments allows us to put forward an explanation for the anomalous orientation of two unique “peripheral” state temples of Cambodia.</p>
 </div>
 <hr>
 <div class="data">
 <p><span class="bold">Key words:</span><br>
 Archaeoastronomy, Angkor Temples, Angkor Wat, Stellarium, Google Earth Pro.</p>
 <p><span class="bold">SDH Reference:</span><br>
 Giulio Magli. 2017. Archaeoastronomy in the Khmer Heartland. <span class="i">Studies in Digital Heritage</span> Volume 1, Issue 1 (February 2017), 17 pages. <br/><span class="doi"><a href="https://doi.org/10.14434/sdh.v1i1.22846">https:doi.org/10.14434/sdh.v1i1.22846</a></span></p>
 </div>
 <hr>
 <br/>
 <section>
 <h2>1. INTRODUCTION</h2>
 <p>The Khmer empire flourished between the eighth and the fourteenth centuries AD. The heartland of the empire was located in the vast Cambodian lowlands, where the kings developed monumental temple architecture as a means for the explicit representation of their power. As a consequence, a series of masterpieces—and especially the so-called “state temples,” like Angkor Wat—were constructed [Jacques and Lafond 2004]. Geographically, these buildings were concentrated in the environs of today’s Siem Reap, first in the area of Roulos, and then later in Angkor, some 15 kilometers to the north. There are, however, two exceptions: Koh Ker, located in northern Cambodia, 85 kilometers northeast of Angkor, and Preah Khan of Kompong Svay, 100 kilometers to the east.</p>
 <p>The Khmer state temples are vast rectangular enclosures with a central unit and several auxiliary buildings and shrines. The aims of such architectural ensembles, whose design in many cases also included the construction of huge <span class="i">barays</span> (water reservoirs), were quite complex, since they functioned as royal residences and major cult centers attesting the beliefs and religiosity of the kings. A further funerary function for the afterlife of the king, although likely, has never been proved. Until a few years ago the temples were even conceived of as “concentrated state towns,” but recent research and mapping on large scale has shown the complexity of the urbanization of the whole Angkor area, casting doubt on the idea of state temples as “capital cities” [Evans and Fletcher 2015; Stark et al. 2015].</p>
 <hr>
 <div class="rights">
 <p>Author's address: Giulio Magli, Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133, Milan, Italy; email: giulio.magli@polimi.it</p>
 <p>Permission to make digital or hardcopies of part or all of this work is granted without fee according to the open access policy of SDH. © 2017 <span class="i">Studies in Digital Heritage</span></p>
 </div>
 <hr>
 <br/>
 <span id="page">Magli 1:2</span><div class="clear"/>
 <br/>
 

<p>Another important aspect highlighted by recent research is the sophistication of the hydraulic system, which led to an impressive modification of the natural environment. It was organized into three grand areas, with the major barays acting as central collectors and with flow management systems towards the south. The barays thus had both a practical and ritualistic function in being explicitly associated with the state temples and embellished with the Mebons, the island temples built inside them [Fletcher et al. 2015].</p>


 
 <br/>
 <span id="page">Magli 1:17</span><div class="clear"/>
 <br/>
 <br/>
 <table>
 <caption>
 Table II. State temples outside the Angkor heartland
 </caption>
 <thead>
 <tr>
 <th></th>
 <th>Orientation</th>
 <th>Notes</th>
 <th>King/date</th>
 </tr>
 </thead>
 <tbody>
 <tr>
 <td>Preah Kahn of Compong Svay</td>
 <td>60 150</td>
 <td></td>
 <td></td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
 <td>Kok Ker</td>
 <td>76 164</td>
 <td></td>
 <td></td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
 <td>Baray</td>
 <td>76 165</td>
 <td></td>
 <td></td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
 <td>Banteay chhmar</td>
 <td>88 178</td>
 <td></td>
 <td>Jayavarman VII 1113-1145</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
 <td>Baray</td>
 <td>88 178</td>
 <td></td>
 <td></td>
 </tr>
 </tbody>
 </table>
 <br/>
 <br/>
 </section>
 </article>
 </body>
 </html> 

Other Notes

1. OJS 3.0 incorporates a new plugin HtmlArticleGalleyPlugin.inc.php that may work in the future

  • New plugin needs further investigation
  • JIRA task IUSW-1242

References
https://github.com/MartinHinz/htmlArticleGalleyJNA
https://github.com/pkp/ojs/blob/master/plugins/generic/htmlArticleGalley/HtmlArticleGalleyPlugin.inc.php

2. Guide and wiki for OJS 3 https://www.gitbook.com/book/pkp/ojs3/details